Focus On: Bath Design

August 25th, 2016

How you will use the spaces within your home can dictate not only their design, but where they will be placed in the overall layout. A bath’s design is no exception to this, which is why it is important to think about what purposes each bathroom space will serve, as well as where they will make the most sense in the overall layout of the home. Here are some things to think about for your bath design when you begin working with a designer.

Master Bath

Influenced By Lifestyle

There is no specific formula for figuring out just how many baths are needed in a home. Instead, homeowners should think about their lifestyle and how and where bathroom spaces would be useful for their family. Beyond the common inclusion of a master bathroom, will there be a need for additional full baths? Some homeowners might feel the need to assign one bath to every bedroom, while others may decide there is only need for one full bath and will add half baths and powder rooms where it makes sense. Others might put a shared bath or jack and jill bath between adjacent rooms or sibling rooms. In multilevel homes, it is also important to think about how far away a bathroom is from each level.


Overall Layouts and Baths

Where will your bathroom space be best located in the overall flow? Beyond the master suite, think about what other areas could use a place to wash and freshen up. If you are building your wood home to act as a ski retreat or a lakeside getaway, a half bath next to the mudroom for cleaning up after these outdoor activities may be a good thing to consider. If you are including an additional level with a communal space and bedrooms, think about whether you will want one communal bathroom, baths located within the bedrooms, or perhaps even both. Will you have a dedicated guest bath? If so, where will it be located in relation to the main living spaces? It is important to find the balance between keeping a guest bath accessible, while still retaining privacy—putting the bath next to the dining room or TV, might not be the ideal place for privacy.

bath sauna

 Bathroom Configurations

Many people get excited about the different features they can incorporate into their baths; from what tile they will use to whether or not the space will include double sinks. That is why it is good to think about things like, whether or not you will keep the toilets segregated from the rest of their baths. Or if the full baths in your home will have a bathtub and shower, or just one. Keep in mind that there are still other ways to customize your bathrooms. For example, a past client once had urinals designed into their bunk room’s bath to accommodate for multiple grandsons. Steam rooms, saunas, and bidets are also popular additions to the conventional bathroom design.


For more pictures of bathrooms and the different styles that can be achieved, take a look at the PrecisionCraft bedroom & bathroom photo gallery.

Log Home Floor Plan Spotlight: The Idlewild

June 15th, 2016

A Log Home Design Inspired by Lake Tahoe, California

Idlewild Log Home Floor Plan by Mountain Architects

Can you imagine bringing your family back from a day of skiing in Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, or Truckee and warming your toes by the stone fireplace in your authentic log home?

The Idlewild design is inspired by Old Tahoe architecture, a style that represents the exquisite beauty of Lake Tahoe as well as the peacefulness of the wilderness surrounding it. Known for its rambling design features, Old Tahoe architecture blends harmoniously with its environment, intertwined with the granite cliffs surrounding the deep blue edge of Lake Tahoe.

M.T.N Design has captured the essence of this unique style and created a spacious home with an intimate feel and abundant character. Will the Idlewild be the inspiration for your custom log home?

View the Idlewild floor plans and elevations.

Building in California? See log home & timber home projects we’ve completed in California.

Focus on: Entryways

April 28th, 2016

An entryway is a portal into your home, setting the tone for the rest of the interior. Although it is the first stop once you step inside, it is not always the first thing you think of when you begin your design process. Here are some things to consider that can help your entryway make a statement in your home. log home entrance

First Impression

One of the first questions to ask yourself when you begin is; what do you want your guest’s to see first when they step through your door? Do you want it to be a sweeping, uninterrupted view of the great room with repeating truss work overhead?  Or perhaps you would like their first impression to come from witnessing a great glass window prow framed in robust logs and overlooking a mountainous terrain. Entryway view


The fluidity of your home is very important and it starts at your front door. Your entry could flow right into the formal, intimate setting of a dining or sitting room. Or you may prefer the entry to continue into a hallway, separating rooms and showcasing art as it leads your visitors into a more informal environment like your main living space. Entry


Your entryway does not have to be limited to a walkway; there are several features you can include to make it functional as well as inviting. The functionality of your entryway can be as simple as including a coat closet or you can make it interactive by including a sitting area where guests can stop to take their shoes off. Will you be building in an area that has harsh winter weather or heavy rain? Consider making that entry space work with the climate by turning it into a mud room where all of your winter jackets and rain boots can dry off without impacting the rest of the home.

5 Unique Designs

March 14th, 2016

As you search through hundreds of log and timber floor plans, you may find that many of them will start to look very similar.  In an effort to get your creative juices flowing, here are some of our most creative and “out of the log home box” designs:

The Cascade

The Cascade is not your typical timber frame design.  With tall timber framed windows that help to hold up the angled timber beams in the roof, this plan really makes a statement. The Cascade concept was inspired by modern Northwestern architecture and provides a great example of how timber frame home design can be pushed outside traditional boundaries.

The Chaumont

The growing trend in mountain style design has been to incorporate many textures and elements into the design of the home.  The Chaumont illustrates how a design can combine square log walls, timber framing, vertical siding, and stone to create a unique living space.

The Targhee


Modern lines and use of large windows is evident, however the incorporation of weathered siding and chinking add a rustic flair.  This is the kind of design that could easily be found in a resort town or development, as it effortlessly blends old and new.

The Upland Retreat


There are many aspects of the Upland Retreat design that could inspire your home: the curved entryway with metal roof; the combination of handcrafted log walls and custom timber frame trusses; or the glass walls that open to the patio.  If you are looking for unique design and one-of-a-kind homes, this is a great place to start.

The Washington Harbor


When thinking about the design of your home, don’t forget to think about the opportunities that outdoor living space can provide.  The Washington Harbor adds actual space to its layout by incorporating a large, covered outdoor space.  The outdoor living room and kitchen are completely covered and have their own built-in fireplace.  Entry is gained from the home through a glass Nana Wall system, while natural light filters down through the clerestory windows.  Outdoor living at its best!

Roof Terminology

January 19th, 2016

Your custom log or timber home is something you’ve been dreaming of for a long time. You’ve even researched just about everything, from the layout, to your flooring options, down to the bathroom hardware. But even the most thought out design would not be complete or protected without the right roof to cap it off. Today we are going to review some common roof terms that will help you in your search.

Common Roof Styles

Gable – A gable roof is a simple triangular roof design that consists of two sloping sides that come together at a ridge.

Advantage: The gable roof design is easy to construct and is often used in areas with high rain and snow loads because its sloping sides lend to easy run-off.

Disadvantage: Due to its simple construction, the gable roof can be more susceptible to damage from high winds.

Gable Roof

Hip – Unlike the gable roof, the hipped roof will slope down from a ridge point to the eaves on all sides of the home. It is a very French inspired roof design and can also be called a pyramid or pavilion roof.

Advantage: Hip roofs too are a great style for snow and rain run-off, while also allowing for large eaves on the home.

Disadvantage:Due to their generally shallow slopes, accessing them for maintenance or for additional interior roof space is often difficult.

Hipped Roof


Shed—Similar to the gable roof, the shed roof features a single sloping plane without ridges or valleys. This style is often thought of as a half-gable roof.

Advantage: Probably the easiest to construct, this roof is great for skylights, but can also protect the interior from excessive sunlight at certain times of day if necessary.

Disadvantage:Due to its simple design, it’s not as equipped for proper drainage like other styles.

Shed Roof


Gambrel – Often seen in barn-style designs, the gambrel roof breaks each sloping section of the roof into two parts—a shallow one closer to the eaves, and one that drops down steeply.

Advantage: Due to its bell shape, this style offers the maximum use of space under the roof.

Disadvantage:Because of the two-part planes of its design, the Gambrel roof is not ideal for the pressure of heavy snowfall.

Gambrel Roof Construction


Other Terminology

DormerA dormer is a window that projects vertically from a sloping roof plane. This feature usually has its own roof, which can vary in style itself—gable, shed, or eyebrow.

Eaves Eaves are located at the edges of a roof and usually project out from the body of the home to offer added protection from the elements.

Valleys A valley is the ‘V’ created where two sloping roof planes come together.

RidgesIn contrast to a valley, a ridge is generally located in the center of the roof or where two planes slope up and meet at a horizontal point.