The Many Styles of a Log Home

January 13th, 2017

Building a home of log or timber creates a structure that is uniquely characterized by its product. While wood homes are seemingly easy to point out, this does not mean that they all look the same. Architectural style, layout and customization all play parts in distinguishing one log home from another. Here are a few styles of architecture that help define the different appearances your wood home can portray.


Western Log and Timber

This style of log home is what we like to call a true mountain-style home due to the typically large-scaled elements used in the design. The lodge-like charm of a western log and timber home includes large picture windowsBig Sky Design to take advantage of the vistas provided by their sprawling landscapes. The Big Sky is one such design concept that includes massive handcrafted log walls and trusses along with stone and glass to create the classic lodge appeal.

Adirondack 

The Adirondack style of building originates from a rugged architectural style that began within the Adirondack Mountains. Distinguished by their rustic appearance, Adirondacks promote a natural look that Ticonderoga Designis organic within its location. With lower pitch roofs, rough detailing of log and twig and stone foundations; these plans are both imaginative and comfortable. The Ticonderoga is a popular floor plan concept in this style due to its rustic appeal. While not as heavy or imposing as the Western Log and Timber style, the Ticonderoga is built with the unique character of a classic Adirondack, including twig designs in the porch and truss system.

French Country

LauretteChateau_largeIn contrast to the mountain-esque appeal of the Western Log and Timber style and Adirondack style, the architecture of a French Country wood home is reminiscent of a traditional countryside estate. Known for their narrow overhangs, smaller windows and stone accents, these log or timber homes fit right into their surroundings while still retaining a stately presence. The Laurette Chateau design concept features all of the attributes of French Country architecture, including smaller curved windows and custom truss work. The square log walls and timber frame accents create a provincial feel against the subtle pitch of the roof.

To explore more styles of timber frame & log home architecture visit the PrecisionCraft Architectural Styles page.

Project Spotlight: Lakeside Log Home

January 10th, 2017

Lakeside Log Cabin Home
Classic Log Homes Complement Lakeside Living

Moose, pronghorn antelope, wolves, osprey and more enjoy the great watering hole found on the shores of Henry’s Lake. Mesmerized by theater-like views of the surrounding wildlife, Doug and Kristin created a log home from which to enjoy their lakeside property in the mountains. Several outdoor seating areas, private balconies, an expansive deck off the main level, and magnificent walls of glass surrender beautiful, uninterrupted views of the lake and mountains. With intimate living spaces and abundant views out, Doug and Kristin have redefined lakefront living with a beautiful log home.

Even with its focus on the outdoors, Doug and Kristin’s log home is completely functional. The master bedroom is located on the main level of the home and each guest bedroom features its own full bath and private access to the outdoors.  Fashioned with a Western, rustic décor, Doug and Kristin’s cabin retreat is adorned with Navajo blankets, heavy wood furniture and custom designed, antler lighting.

Doug and Kristen’s home was inspired by PrecisionCraft’s Tahoe log home plan.

Log Home Great Room

December’s Log Home Floor Plan of the Month

December 3rd, 2016

The inspiration for the Shenandoah log home floor plan comes from the cozy log cabin ideal of yesteryear. Even though this design is a single level with only 2,136 sq.ft., the plan is open and has an abundance of character. From the columns in the picture window to the extensive use of vaulted ceilings lined with log rafters, this plan is designed to turn heads.

With the Shenandoah log home plan, entertaining guests outside is an effortless adventure. Designed with over 300 sq. ft. of outdoor living space and a rustic stone fireplace, guests will feel right at home.

 

Get more details on the Shenandoah Log Home Plan or view PrecisionCraft’s log home floor plan gallery.

Every floor plan, like the Shenandoah, is professionally rendered to help clients envision what the exterior of their homes will look like. Each new design is based on past experiences with clients, M.T.N Design’s own unique log & timber home vision, and the latest trends in the log home industry. The ultimate goal is simply to inspire.

Designing for a Sloped or Steep Site

October 2nd, 2016

Orientation to views & working with the slope

Sloped sites go hand-in-hand with scenic views. This is one of the primary reason people build houses on sloping terrain. Usually the steeper the site the more view that is available. Quite often there will be a choice of views and/or slopes on a site. In these cases the best view is the one to build toward and then deal with whatever the slope is in order to enjoy that particular view.

Grade contours at start of design

In order to place and design the house to fit the slope of the land grade contours must be provided to the Architect or Designer at the beginning of the process through a topographic survey. Without these contours the design process becomes guesswork which can lead to unnecessary added expense to the homeowner. Rules on height limits from Development and Local Building Codes. Another design parameter that is necessary to know at the beginning of the process is what the height and setback limits of the Development and the Local Building Codes are. A working understanding of these parameters will lead to a successful project. Sloped sites can increase the complication of determining these height limits. Obtaining a written version of the authority’s definition helps the designer to understand what the limits are.

Slope dictates daylight basement for economic reasons

Quite often homeowners don’t comprehend the economic advantages of a daylight basement. They miss the point that if you’re building on a sloped site the foundation of the house will need to be much taller on the downhill side of the house. If the slope is steep enough (and more often than not it is) you’ll wind up with enough height inside the foundation walls to have livable space at the basement level (daylight basement). This is a low-cost solution for additional livable space.

Drainage on uphill side must be addressed

As a house is placed on a slope the uphill side of the site will naturally drain down into the house. In order to prevent an ugly situation a continuous slope running away from the house must be designed in.

Use of retaining walls uphill and down

In some instances a retaining wall must be placed on the uphill side to hold back the slope and create drainage for that side of the house. On the downhill side retaining walls are used to create larger flat areas for patios, etc.

Stepping of Floor Plan to work with the site

Single level ranch style houses don’t work very well on a steep slope. The best solution on a site of this type is to step the house down the slope. This fits the house in with its surroundings and helps solve the Height Limit issue. It also creates a more exciting design and eliminates extra tall foundations.

Focus On: Bath Design

August 25th, 2016

How you will use the spaces within your home can dictate not only their design, but where they will be placed in the overall layout. A bath’s design is no exception to this, which is why it is important to think about what purposes each bathroom space will serve, as well as where they will make the most sense in the overall layout of the home. Here are some things to think about for your bath design when you begin working with a designer.

Master Bath

Influenced By Lifestyle

There is no specific formula for figuring out just how many baths are needed in a home. Instead, homeowners should think about their lifestyle and how and where bathroom spaces would be useful for their family. Beyond the common inclusion of a master bathroom, will there be a need for additional full baths? Some homeowners might feel the need to assign one bath to every bedroom, while others may decide there is only need for one full bath and will add half baths and powder rooms where it makes sense. Others might put a shared bath or jack and jill bath between adjacent rooms or sibling rooms. In multilevel homes, it is also important to think about how far away a bathroom is from each level.

bathroom

Overall Layouts and Baths

Where will your bathroom space be best located in the overall flow? Beyond the master suite, think about what other areas could use a place to wash and freshen up. If you are building your wood home to act as a ski retreat or a lakeside getaway, a half bath next to the mudroom for cleaning up after these outdoor activities may be a good thing to consider. If you are including an additional level with a communal space and bedrooms, think about whether you will want one communal bathroom, baths located within the bedrooms, or perhaps even both. Will you have a dedicated guest bath? If so, where will it be located in relation to the main living spaces? It is important to find the balance between keeping a guest bath accessible, while still retaining privacy—putting the bath next to the dining room or TV, might not be the ideal place for privacy.

bath sauna

 Bathroom Configurations

Many people get excited about the different features they can incorporate into their baths; from what tile they will use to whether or not the space will include double sinks. That is why it is good to think about things like, whether or not you will keep the toilets segregated from the rest of their baths. Or if the full baths in your home will have a bathtub and shower, or just one. Keep in mind that there are still other ways to customize your bathrooms. For example, a past client once had urinals designed into their bunk room’s bath to accommodate for multiple grandsons. Steam rooms, saunas, and bidets are also popular additions to the conventional bathroom design.

 

For more pictures of bathrooms and the different styles that can be achieved, take a look at the PrecisionCraft bedroom & bathroom photo gallery.