Roof Terminology

Your custom log or timber home is something you’ve been dreaming of for a long time. You’ve even researched just about everything, from the layout, to your flooring options, down to the bathroom hardware. But even the most thought out design would not be complete or protected without the right roof to cap it off. Today we are going to review some common roof terms that will help you in your search.

Common Roof Styles

Gable – A gable roof is a simple triangular roof design that consists of two sloping sides that come together at a ridge.

Advantage: The gable roof design is easy to construct and is often used in areas with high rain and snow loads because its sloping sides lend to easy run-off.

Disadvantage: Due to its simple construction, the gable roof can be more susceptible to damage from high winds.

Gable Roof

Hip – Unlike the gable roof, the hipped roof will slope down from a ridge point to the eaves on all sides of the home. It is a very French inspired roof design and can also be called a pyramid or pavilion roof.

Advantage: Hip roofs too are a great style for snow and rain run-off, while also allowing for large eaves on the home.

Disadvantage:Due to their generally shallow slopes, accessing them for maintenance or for additional interior roof space is often difficult.

Hipped Roof

 

Shed—Similar to the gable roof, the shed roof features a single sloping plane without ridges or valleys. This style is often thought of as a half-gable roof.

Advantage: Probably the easiest to construct, this roof is great for skylights, but can also protect the interior from excessive sunlight at certain times of day if necessary.

Disadvantage:Due to its simple design, it’s not as equipped for proper drainage like other styles.

Shed Roof

 

Gambrel – Often seen in barn-style designs, the gambrel roof breaks each sloping section of the roof into two parts—a shallow one closer to the eaves, and one that drops down steeply.

Advantage: Due to its bell shape, this style offers the maximum use of space under the roof.

Disadvantage:Because of the two-part planes of its design, the Gambrel roof is not ideal for the pressure of heavy snowfall.

Gambrel Roof Construction

 

Other Terminology

DormerA dormer is a window that projects vertically from a sloping roof plane. This feature usually has its own roof, which can vary in style itself—gable, shed, or eyebrow.

Eaves Eaves are located at the edges of a roof and usually project out from the body of the home to offer added protection from the elements.

Valleys A valley is the ‘V’ created where two sloping roof planes come together.

RidgesIn contrast to a valley, a ridge is generally located in the center of the roof or where two planes slope up and meet at a horizontal point.

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